(10 cubic inch plug)

Red Osier Dogwood
Cornus sericea

(10 cubic inch plug)

Available Plants 


​* All plants subject to availability when we place our final plant order after January 29th. We'll contact you if there are any changes to your order and refund you if something is no longer available. 

Scotch Pine
Pinus sylvestris

This is a deciduous shrub known for its edible blue berries can grow up to 30 feet tall and 20 feet wide. It prefers moist, well-drained soils with good sun exposure. It is a great selection for riparian restoration and provides habitat and food for a variety of wildlife species.

Plant Guide: https://plants.sc.egov.usda.gov/plantguide/pdf/cs_sanic5.pdf​

How to order: 


1. Browse our selection below


2. Order with the form to the right


3. Pay when you receive your bill


4.Submit your cash or check payment by 5pm on January 29th by


Mail:

P.O. Box 438                 OR

St. John, WA 99171                 


*Trees not paid for by 5pm on Jan. 29th will not be ordered! 


5. Pick-up your trees from our cooler on April 9th during business hours or April 10th from 8am-12pm. 


This large pine tree can grow upwards of 200 feet tall with a trunk up to 6 feet in diameter. They can tolerate a variety of temperature and precipitation ranges, but do best with good drainage and sun exposure. 


This deciduous tree/shrub can grow up to bout 30 feet tall and typically grows in clusters along streams and lakes. The bark is thin and dark reddish-brown to black and, unlike other birch species, does not peel. This species is very shade tolerant, and a great choice for riparian areas for stream bank erosion prevention as well as wildlife habitat and forage.

Plant Guide: https://plants.usda.gov/plantguide/pdf/pg_beoc2.pdf​

(10 cubic inch plug)

Palouse-Rock Lake Conservation District

Phone: +1.5096483680      Address: 3 N. Park Street, St. john WA 99171    

Siberian Peashrub

Caragana aborescens

Rocky Mountain Maple
Acer glabrum

This shrub-like willow grows up to 20 feet tall and has distinctive greyish-green narrow tapered leaves. They prefer very moist soils along stream banks and in wetlands. This is a useful species as its root systems helps prevent streambank erosion in riparian habitats and provides forage and shelter for wildlife species.

Plant Guide: https://plants.sc.egov.usda.gov/plantguide/pdf/cs_saex.pdf

(10 cubic inch plug)

Silver Buffaloberry

Shepherdia argentea

(10 cubic inch plug)

​*Subject to change pending to COVID-19 restrictions

This native pine tree can grow upwards of 70 feet and is adapted to full sun or partial shade and a variety of soil types. Their yellowish green needles come in bundles of two and their small cones remain mostly closed and attached to the tree for years. 

Lodgepole Pine
Pinus contorta

(10 cubic inch plug)

Quaking Aspen
Populus tremuloides

Also referred to as Douglas Hawthorn, this deciduous tree or spreading shrub known for its long woody thorns and white flower clusters can grow up to 35 feet tall and can occur in open fields, forest edges or riparian areas, but typically prefers areas with full sun to partial shade and moist soils. This species is also fire tolerant and provides abundant food and shelter for a variety of wildlife species.

Plant Guide: https://plants.usda.gov/plantguide/pdf/pg_crdo2.pdf

Mock Orange
Philadelphus lewisii

Black Hawthorn

Crataegus douglasii

(10 cubic inch plug)

Snowberry

Symphiocarpos albus

Prices


Plant total = 1-99            $3.50/plant

Plant Total =100-499       $2.50/plant

Plant Total = 500+           $2.00/plant

Water Birch

Betula occidentalis

This deciduous shrub can grow up to 20 feet tall and spread 20 feet wide and is typically found along streams and lakes where the soil is saturated for at least part of the growing season. It’s recognizable by its red stems and white flower clusters; an excellent choice for riparian areas to help aid in bank stabilization as well as provide habitat for birds and forage for deer, elk and moose.

Plant Guide: https://plants.sc.egov.usda.gov/plantguide/pdf/cs_cose16.pdf​

(10 cubic inch plug)

At our office: 
3 N Park Street

St. John, WA 99171

(5.5 cubic inch plug)

Black Cottonwood
Populus trichocarpa

(10 cubic inch plug)

(5.5 cubic inch plug)

Mackenzie Willow
Salix prolixa

Coyote Willow

Salix exigua

(5.5 cubic inch plug)

This introduced deciduous shrub or small tree grows between 10 and 15 feet tall and can grow in well drained soils or even drought like conditions. It prefers full sun but can tolerate some shade and it known for its ability to grow in poor conditions. It is typically recommended as good nitrogen fixing windbreaker. It can provide cover for upland game as well as produces seeds that are a great food source for wildlife.

Plant Guide: https://plants.usda.gov/plantguide/pdf/pg_caar18.pdf​

(10 cubic inch plug)

This spreading deciduous shrub grows 4 to 12 feet tall and 3 to 9 ft wide and thrives in full sun to moderate shade on moist, well drained soils. It prefers streamsides or open woods, but can also be found on moderately dry rocky slopes. This is a great species for stream bank stabilization as well as erosion control on hillsides or rocky slopes. The large white, 4 petaled flowers also provide great nectar resource for local pollinators.

Plant Guide: https://plants.usda.gov/factsheet/pdf/fs_phle4.pdf​

(5.5 cubic inch plug)

Ponderosa Pine
Pinus ponderosa

Drummond Willow
Salix drummondiana

(5.5 cubic inch plug)

(10 cubic inch plug)

(10 cubic inch plug)

(10 cubic inch plug)

This deciduous shrub or small tree grows from 6 to 20 feet tall. It has limited drought and shade tolerance, and prefers habitat along streams or moist hillsides. Its thorny thickets provide cover for a variety of bird species and it also produces bright red edible berries.

Plant Guide: https://plants.usda.gov/factsheet/pdf/fs_shar.pdf​

This deciduous shrub or small tree grows between 6 and 30 feet tall. It prefers moist, well-drained soils in rocky areas or along streambanks. It is a desirable forage species for big game and provides habitat for a variety of other wildlife species.

Plant Guide: https://plants.usda.gov/plantguide/pdf/pg_acgl.pdf​

Western White Pine

Pinus monticola

PRLCD 2021 TREE SALE!

Now taking pre-orders

This small-medium spreading shrub can grow to about 12 feet tall. It is tolerant of a wide variety of soil types, but prefers moist soils. It is a great conservation species, ideal for streambank erosion control and wetland restoration. It is also great for wildlife forage and habitat.

Plant Guide: https://plants.sc.egov.usda.gov/plantguide/pdf/pg_sadr.pdf​

This deciduous tree known for its distinctive white bark and vibrant color changing leaves grows up to 80 feet tall in ideal conditions. It can tolerate a variety of soil and moisture conditions, but prefers site that remain moist throughout the majority of the year. While it will tolerate dryer soils, it may stunt its growth. This is a great conservation species that provides food and habitat for a variety of wildlife.

Plant Guide: https://plants.usda.gov/plantguide/pdf/cs_potr5.pdf​

Questions? Contact us!

(10 cubic inch plug)

Douglas Fir
Pseudotsuga menziesii

Also called Scots Pine, this tree typically grows from 50 to 100 feet tall and is one of the most widespread conifers in the world. It tolerates a wide variety of soil types, but does best in soils that are well-drained, and prefers full sunlight exposure as it is not shade tolerant. ​

This native evergreen can reach upwards of 200 feet in height and 10 feet in width. It prefers moist, but very well drained soils and full to partial shade. The species has historically been one of the most valuable timber trees and provides habitat and food for a variety of wildlife species as well.

Plant Guide: https://plants.usda.gov/plantguide/pdf/cs_psme.pdf​

This fast growing deciduous tree can grow up to 100 feet tall and is easy to establish, often used in riparian habitats or for windbreaks. They tolerate a variety of soils, but in dryer climates prefer stream banks and areas with good moisture and full sunlight. Their aggressive root systems make them a valuable conservation species aiding in streambank stabilization and they provide food and habitat for a variety of wildlife species.

Plant Guide: https://plants.sc.egov.usda.gov/plantguide/pdf/cs_pobat.pdf

Scouler's Willow

Salix scouleriana

This large tree can grow upwards of 100 feet in height and their trunks up to 3 ft in diameter. It can grow in a variety of locations and soils throughout the region as it is one of the most widely distributed pines in North America. They prefer 14-30in annual precipitation zones with full sunlight and well-draining soils.

Plant Guide: https://plants.usda.gov/plantguide/pdf/pg_pipo.pdf​

This medium shrub-like, multi-stemmed willow can grow anywhere from 6 to 30 feet tall. It prefers moist soils and is typically found on rocky stream and river edges. It is a great choice for stream bank stabilization and wildlife habitat and forage in riparian areas.

Plant Guide: https://plants.usda.gov/plantguide/pdf/pg_sapr3.pdf​

Blue Elderberry
Sambucus cerulea

(10 cubic inch plug)

This deciduous shrub or small tree grows between 6 and 30 feet tall. It prefers moist, well-drained soils in rocky areas or along streambanks. It is a desirable forage species for big game and provides habitat for a variety of other wildlife species.

Plant Guide: https://plants.usda.gov/plantguide/pdf/pg_acgl.pdf​

This deciduous shrub typically grows anywhere from 3 to 8 feet tall, and is identifiable by its clusters of white berries which it’s named after. It tolerates sun or shade and typically is found on slopes or hillsides as it is a great soil stabilizer due to its rhizomatous underground root systems. It is also an important browse species for a variety of wildlife.

Plant Guide: https://plants.usda.gov/plantguide/pdf/cs_syal.pdf​